Privacy Protection Act in Hospitals and EHRs


The privacy discussion is quickly becoming pretty hot in South East Asia region with Malaysia coming up with the PDPA (Privacy Data Protection Act) with Singapore coming up with a similar Act next year (2012).

In recent “Beyond EHR” conference in Singapore several weeks ago, I was grateful to chair a panel discussion with leaders of some of the countries with national experiences from the UK, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, etc and with leading experts in room from Australia, Malaysia, Philippines, Dubai, Canada, etc, my sense out of it was that a lot of the details of the PDPA sort of laws was perhaps not necessary a broad spectrum discussion  among a broader set of professionals than I would have initially guessed.

I also looked for some clues to see what ISO TC215 was doing in this area, but speaking today with one of the key member of ISO TC215 and founding member of work-group 4, the general discussion seems to imply that the emphasis is around security and not privacy.

While the two I see as being inter-related somewhat, with privacy acts becoming a law, I am yet to get a sense of urgency for this discussion.

I found some of my colleagues in Canada have written this interesting point of view.

A new era of transparency for hospitals

Changes to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

A new era of transparency for hospitals On December 8, 2010, the Ontario government passed legislation to broaden the scope of theFreedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and designate hospitals as “institutions” under the Act. Ontario will usher in a new era of transparency and giving hospitals approximately one year to comply with FIPPA, the changes to which will be effective on January 1, 2012.Read More …
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HIT + hIT = HIT 2.0


I strongly welcome market consolidation especially when it comes to healthcare IT (HIT companies becoming one with How-of IT (hIT). Some of the big HIT vendors today are still largely have more healthcare know-hows than the leading IT houses, while many of IT houses on average of their business struggle to spell healthcare. As combined companies, I look forward to the HIT 2.0 technologies. While this is a theoretical model, we are starting to see interesting consolidation plays.

Microsoft and GE Healthcare JV Deal


Last week, GE Healthcare and Microsoft launched the JV company. Snippets of news below

GE, Microsoft to Launch Joint Venture Aimed at Global Healthcare System Transformation
50/50 JV combines Microsoft’s deep platform expertise with GE Healthcare’s experience in clinical and administrative workflow solutions.
The two parent companies bring complementary expertise to this new venture and will contribute intellectual property, including the following:
Microsoft Amalga, an enterprise health intelligence platform
Microsoft Vergence, an SSO & CMS
Microsoft expreSSO, an enterprise single sign-on solution
GE Healthcare eHealth, a Health Information Exchange
GE Healthcare Qualibria, a clinical knowledge application environment being developed in cooperation with Intermountain Healthcare (Salt Lake City, Utah) and Mayo Clinic Source

Personally, I am pleased to see this. It’s great to see the super fragmented market starting starting to consolidate. Ultimately, this is good news for patients.

This is a great example of convergence that sounds logical, that bring together a company that knows how to make products while another company that has access to market. The cross sell leverage of the 2 firms combined is enormous.

It wasn’t that long ago that Microsoft had sold off it’s Amalga HIS solution to Orion Health. This asset in the hands of Orion Health, is this a set-up for someone bigger to buy-out?

Who makes the next move? Oracle, SAP, epic, Allscript, Cerner, Orionhealth, CSC/iSoft, etc.

We probably need to see another few big moves and give it 5 – 7 years to see next generation of healthcare apps. Exciting times.

Callum Bir

Achieving Interoperability – Role of Standards in EHR


During the afternoon session of the pre-conference workshop titled “Going Beyond EHR” during the IBC Asia EHR Asia Conference as the chair, kick started using the following slides:

This was then followed by Case-Studies from Singapore and the US, followed by Panel Discussion.

It was interesting to get a lot of questions from our attendees from Philippines, Dubai, Malaysia and Singapore.